Kimberly Chaney

Assistant Professor

Psychological Sciences


Research Overview

My programs of research broadly ask: 1) How do lay beliefs about prejudice impact perceptions of prejudice? 2) How does prejudice affect stigmatized group members’ health, performance, and behavior? and 3) How and when do prejudice confrontations reduce prejudice and improve a confronter’s health? To elucidate these effects, I employ an array of methodologies (e.g., behavioral, physiological, and implicit cognition), and I consider the interpersonal and cognitive (e.g., attentional bias) mechanisms of stigma and prejudice to understand underlying processes. By examining both basic and applied questions about how people perceive, experience, and combat prejudice in their day-to-day lives, my research aims to broaden our understanding of prejudice and stigma, especially as it relates to cognitive, health, and behavioral outcomes.

Education

PhD, Psychology Rutgers University, 2020

Recent Publications

Chaney, K. E., Sanchez, D. T., & Remedios, J. D. (in press). Dual cues: Women of color anticipate both gender and racial bias in the face of a single identity cue. Group Processes and Intergroup Relations.
Chaney, K. E., Sanchez, D. T., & Saud, L. (in press). White categorical ambiguity: Exclusion of Middle Eastern Americans from the White racial category. Social Psychological and Personality Science.
Chaney, K. E., Sanchez, D. T., Himmelstein, M. S., & Manuel, S. K. (in press). Lay theory of generalized prejudice moderates cardiovascular stress responses to racism for White women. Group Processes and Intergroup Relations.
Chaney, K. E., Sanchez, D. T., Alt, N. P., & Shih, M. (in press). The breadth of confrontations as a prejudice reduction strategy. Social Psychological and Personality Science.
Chaney, K. E., Sanchez, D. T., & Maimon, M. (2019). Stigmatized-identity cues in consumer spaces. Journal of Consumer Psychology, 29(1), 130-141.
Alt, N. P., Chaney, K. E., & Shih, M. (2019). “But that was meant to be a compliment!”: Evaluative costs of confronting positive racial stereotypes. Group Processes and Intergroup Relations, 22(5), 655-672.
Chaney, K. E., Rudman, L. A., Fetterolf, J., & Young, D. M. (2019). Paying a price for domestic equality: Risk factors for backlash against nontraditional husbands. Gender Issues, 36(1), 3-22.
Sanchez, D. T., Chaney, K. E., & Maimon, M. (2019). Stigmatized-identity cues and consumer applications revisited. Journal of Consumer Psychology, 29(1), 160-164.
Chaney, K. E. & Sanchez, D. T. (2018). The endurance of interpersonal confrontations as a prejudice reduction strategy. Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, 44(3), 418-429.
Chaney, K. E. & Sanchez, D. T. (2018). Gender-inclusive bathrooms signal fairness across identity dimensions. Social Psychological and Personality Science, 9(2), 245-253.
Chaney, K. E., Sanchez, D. T., & Remedios, J. D. (2018). We are in this together: How the presence of similarly stereotyped allies buffer against identity threats. Journal of Experimental Social Psychology, 79, 410-422.
Sanchez, D. T., Chaney, K. E., Manuel, S. K., & Remedios, J. D. (2018). Theory of prejudice and American identity threat transfer for Latino and Asian Americans. Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, 44(7), 972-983.
Manuel, S. K., Howansky, K., Chaney, K. E., & Sanchez, D. T. (2017). No rest for the stigmatized: A model of organizational health and workplace sexism (OHWS). Sex Roles, 77, 697-708.
Sanchez, D. T., Chaney, K. E., Manuel, S. K., Wilton, L. S., & Remedios, J. D. (2017). Stigma by prejudice transfer: Why racism threatens White women and sexism threatens men of color. Psychological Science, 28(4), 445-461.
Chaney, K. E., Sanchez, D. T., & Remedios, J. D. (2016). Organizational identity safety cue transfers. Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, 42(11), 1564-1576.
Chaney, K. E., Young, D. M., & Sanchez, D. T. (2015). Confrontation’s Health Outcomes and Promotion of Egalitarianism (C-HOPE) framework. Translational Issues in Psychological Science, 1(4), 363-371.

Contact Information
Emailkim.chaney@uconn.edu
Phone484.798.8107
Mailing Address167 Bousfield, 406 Babbidge Road Storrs, CT 06269